Reviews are important

grace's shirt
From The Day I Ran Away

You write a story that you love, you find an editor that loves it too, but the true test is the readers. Will readers love your story? Will they tell others about it? As the viable paths to publication grow, there are more books vying for the readers attention. So reviews are essential for book sales and book sales increase an author’s chance of future publications. There are usually reviews for a few months leading to a book release and a few months after. So it was a happy moment when I saw Melinda Johnson’s  review of The Day I Ran Away 18 months after publication. 

At her blog, More to the Story, Melinda, an author with a master’s in English literature, teases out the layers that make a story one to remember. Her reviews would be helpful to parents, but also great for teachers to use as the talk with students about writing.

When I write I story I’m thinking about some layers but Melinda found layers I didn’t even know I’d slipped into my story.  Here’s a excerpt:

The Day I Ran Away from Flashlight Press is like a well-choreographed dance. Three characters, two voices, three points of view, two timelines, two picture sequences, and a dog spin around each other with no missed beats. The threads fall together easily, and despite action and humor in Isabella Ongaro’s illustrations, the tone of the book is peaceful. The little girl’s growing drowsiness in the bedtime pictures makes sense. She’s been on a big adventure that never took her beyond the reach of love and safety. You’ll want to read The Day I Ran Away over again, even if you aren’t a preschooler, because there’s more to ponder each time you page through the story.

Please visit Melinda’s blog and read some of her thoughtful reviews. And, when you read book you like, write a review! An author will appreciate it!

Picture books & Conversations (part 2)

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My big sister reading to me

Last week I talked about using picture books to talk with children about issues or other topics. Sometimes we can introduce a topic that a child hasn’t experienced.  I still remember my children’s reaction when we read the book Fly Away Home, by Eve Bunting. It allowed us to talk about people who did not have all the things they had in their lives.

Sometimes we can use a book to explore things we all experience.  In The Day I Ran Away, Grace is having a bad day (who hasn’t had one of those!). Her favorite shirt is dirty, her favorite cereal is all gone, she gets sent to her room after a tantrum and, when she colors her white shirt purple, Mom takes her markers away. That’s when Grace decides to run away, but how can you run away if you aren’t allowed to cross the street? We can use this book to talk with children about:

Bad days

  • Have you had a bad day? Why?
  • Share a bad day you’ve had
  • How can we make a bad day better?

Favorite things

  • What is your favorite: color, food, item of clothing, book, etc.
  • What would you do if a favorite thing was missing?

Rules

  • Grace wasn’t allowed to cross the street? Is that a good rule? Why?
  • What rules do you have in your house?
  • What happens if you don’t follow the rules?
  • Why do we have rules?
  • Was it right for Grace to lose her markers for a week?

Saying you’re sorry

  • Grace makes a picture for her mom as a peace offering.
  • What is a peace offering?
  • Why is it good to say you are sorry?
  • How do you feel when someone apologizes to you?
  • What are ways you can tell someone you are sorry?

Yoga

  • Grace is doing bedtime yoga. What is yoga?
  • Have you ever done yoga?
  • Why does she do it at bedtime?
  • What other things can you do to calm down at bedtime?
grace's shirt
From The Day I Ran Away

Picture books can start conversations

42747118_1927805887309834_6118873833110765568_nReading to a child gives us a perfect opportunity to start conversations. You may choose a book such as Mr. Worry: A story about OCD or I Can’t Stop: A story about Tourette Syndrome that deal with a specific topic, but most picture books can be used to start conversations.

In No More Noisy Nights, Jackson has moved into a new home. After a day of unpacking he’s ready to sleep, but it turns out he’s sharing his home with some creatures that are noisy at night. Jackson has to use his best problem solving skills to quiet the creatures so he can get a good nights sleep. We can use this picture book to talk with children about:

Fears

  • Talk about Jackson. Was he afraid? Why or why not?
  • Ask questions such as: Have you ever heard scary sounds? What did you do? Are there are things that scare you?
  • Share fears you had as a child or now.

Problem solving

  • Talk about the way Jackson solved his problems. What else could he have done?
  • Talk about solutions for the fears they shared

Moving

  • Moving can be hard, but we bring things with us that help our new house feel like home. What things did Jackson bring? What things would you bring?
  • Make a list of the good and bad things about moving.

Making friends

  • The creatures in Jackson’s house were noisy. How did he treat them?
  • How do you like to be treated?
  • How did Jackson make new friends?

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From No More Noisy Nights

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